Almo Plaza

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Almo Plaza
Alamo today
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The U.S. Army’s departure from the Alamo ca. 1877 opened a new chapter in the life of the Alamo. Still owned by Catholic Church, the local Bishop decided to sell the property. The City of San Antonio bought the area that still contained the Low Barrack. This area is now known as Alamo Plaza. Much to the displeasure of many Texans, the Long Barrack became a mercantile establishment. The old church was bought by the State of Texas in 1883, which designated it as a memorial to the memory of the Alamo Heroes. The Daughters of the Republic of Texas bought the Long Barrack which was then purchased from them by the State of Texas in 1905. From 1905 until 2012, the Daughters of the Republic of Texas served as the State appointed guardian of the Alamo Complex.

All postcards are courtesy of Bruce McKenzie Martin.
Image courtesy of George Nelson.
Almo Plaza
Alamo 1842
Alamo 1861
The arrival of the U.S. Army following Texas’ admittance to the Union in 1845, helped revive a community devastated by war. In 1848, after the U.S. Mexican War the remaining Alamo buildings were leased by the Catholic Church to the U.S. Army as the complex became a Quartermaster Depot. In 1850, the Army added the rounded parapet or “hump” on top of the Alamo church façade while building a new second floor and gabled roof for supplies storage.

Despite the Civil War years, the town continued to grow as many of the town’s original structures were replaced by others of more modern design.

Image courtesy of George Nelson.
Almo Plaza
Alamo 1836
The Texas Revolution was part of a larger Mexico civil war between two political factions—the Federalists and the Centralists. In Texas, the original goal was to overthrow Santa Anna, restore the Federal Constitution of 1824, and obtain separate statehood for Texas within the Mexican Federal Republic. The Alamo was the scene of the revolution’s most famous battle.

Image courtesy of George Nelson.
Almo Plaza
Alamo 1803 to 1835
Mexico finally won it’s independence from Spain in 1821. Colonization was viewed by the Mexican government as a way to bring prosperity to Texas. By 1835, however, the unrest sparked by Santa Anna’s abandonment of the Federal Constitution of 1824 finally erupted into open revolt against the Mexican government. The Alamo continued its role as frontier outpost.

Image courtesy of George Nelson.
Almo Plaza
Alamo 1785
During the late 18th century, Spain was struggling to keep control of its overseas possessions. Napoleon’s invasion of Spain (1808) and Father Hidalgo’s revolt beginning in 1810 sparked resistance to Spanish rule in Texas. During this period, the Alamo served as a frontier outpost on New Spain’s far northern border.

In 1803, La Segunda Compañía Volante de San Carlos de Parras (Alamo de Parras), a company of Spanish Colonial mounted lancers, arrived at the secularized mission, constructed the low barracks around the gateway entrance and remained in San Antonio for the next 32 years. Their lasting military legacy gave their name to the former Mission San Antonio de Valero that became the Alamo. Members of the Compania del Alamo became involved in the military, civil and political affairs including the Mexican War for Independence and the Texas Revolution.

Image courtesy of George Nelson.
Almo Plaza
Alamo 1836
The Texas Revolution was part of a larger Mexico civil war between two political factions—the Federalists and the Centralists. In Texas, the original goal was to overthrow Santa Anna, restore the Federal Constitution of 1824, and obtain separate statehood for Texas within the Mexican Federal Republic. The Alamo was the scene of the revolution’s most famous battle.

Image courtesy of George Nelson.
Almo Plaza

Credit

This mobile tour of historic Alamo Plaza would not have been possible without the assistance of many partners.

Dr. Bruce Winders, The Alamo Curator, Historian and Author

Gary L. Foreman, Native Sun Productions www.nativesunproductions.com

George Nelson, Author of The Alamo: An Illustrated History

The Daughters of the Republic of Texas

State of Texas General Land Office

The Alamo Chapter #40, The Sons of the Republic of Texas

Bob Benavides, San Antonio Living History Association

City of San Antonio’s, Office of Historic Preservation

City of San Antonio’s, Center City Development Office

Images were provided by the following individuals and institutions:

Gary Foreman Photography/Model by Mark Lemon

The Alamo Collection, Artist Gary Zaboly

Mike Harris

The McNay Art Museum

George Nelson

Bruce Mackenzie Martin